IELTS Writing Task 1 (Pie Chart)


You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.

The Pie chart below shows the average household expenditure in Japan and Malaysia in the year 2010.

Summaries the information by selecting and reporting the main features, and make comparisons where relevant.

 

write at least 150 words.

IELTS Writing Task 1 (Pie Chart)

 

 


Answer

 

A glance at the pie charts reveals information about the proportion of money spent on household expenses in Japan and Malaysia in 2010.

Overall, Japan spent the highest amount of money on goods and services where Housing was the highest sector of expenditure in Malaysia. Both countries spent the least amount of money in the Health care sector in 2010.

Japan expenditure the highest amount of money than Malaysia in 3 sectors likely: Other goods and services, Transport, and Health care sectors. Other goods and services were the highest sectors of expenditure in Japan which was 29%, whereas Malaysia spends 26% in this sector. In the transport and Health care sector Japan spends respectively 20% and 6% of its total expenditure which was two-fold in comparison to Malaysia’s expenditure in these sectors.

In sectors like Housing and Food, Malaysia expenditure most than Japan. Housing was the highest sector of expenditure in 2010 which was 34%, meanwhile, Japan spends only 21% on Housing this year. In the Food sector, Malaysia and Japan spend respectively 27% and 24% in 2010.

 

178 Words


 

9 thoughts on “”

  1. The graph illustrates in which proportion is money spent by that the population of Japan and Malaysia in the year 2010. The outgoings are classified in five different groups: Housing, Transport, Food, Health care and Other goods and services.

    Overall, in Malaysia the highest percentage is spent in Housing, while in Japan the major expenditure is in Other goods and services. This is at 34% the former and 29% the latter. On the other hand, in both Japan and Malaysia the lowest participation rate corresponds to Health care, with 6% and 3% respectively.

    The second largest category is for both countries Food. While in Japan meal represents 24% of the budget, in Malaysia is at 27%. The third classification in Japan is Housing, whereas in Malaysia is Other goods and services, at 21% and 26% respectively. Finally, the second shortest group belongs to Transport in both Japan and Malaysia, at 10%.

  2. The pie chart gives information about the percentage of spending on five different categories in both Japan and Malaysia in 2010. Segments are represented by different colors.
    Overall, it is clear that people in Malaysia spent more money for housing while Japanese used more money for transportation rather than people in Malaysia. Japanese are more than 3% in health care in comparison with Malaysia.
    The most spending in Japan was other goods and services at 29%. The spending on health care, was the lowest percentage shown on the figure. The similar proportion can be seen in food, housing and transportation. The percentage of those three sectors were 24%, 21% and 20% respectively.
    Looking at the figure for Malaysia, people who lived in Malaysia spent large amount of money to buy house, at 34%. By contrast, the spending for health was just only 3%. It is also found that 10% of expenditure in transportation and 26% of other goods and services. Furthermore, spending on food, was the second highest expenditure in Malaysia in 2010.

  3. The Pie charts depict the detailed information about the minimum household expenditure in Japan and Malaysia in the year 2010.

    The first pie chart tells us about average household expenditure in Japan in 2010. the percentages of household expenditure in housing, transport, food, health care and other goods and servicies were 21%, 20%, 24%, 6%, and 29% respectively. However, the second pie chart illustrates the information about average household expenditure in Malaysia in 2010 and the percentages of household expenditure in housing, transport, food, health care and other goods and servicies were 34%, 10%, 26%, 3%, and 27% respectively. Furthermore, it can be said that the percentages of transport and health care in Japan is doubled the percentages in Malaysia. Moreover, Japan’s highest percentange in household expenditure is other goods and services but the highest percentange in household expenditure in Malaysia is housing. Moreover, the lowest percentage in household expenditure in Japan and Malaysia is health care.

    Overall, It is clearly visible that the smallest contribution of household expenditure in both the country Japan and Malaysia is same. However, Japan and Malaysia do have their own differences and vice-versa in the percentages of household expenditure.

    Total word = 195

  4. The given pie chart illustrates information about the proportion of household expenses in Japan and Malaysia in 2010.

    Overall, what stands out the most is that health care occupies the least percentage in both Malaysia and Japan. Another interesting point is that Japanese households spend money the most on goods and services while housing was the highest expenses in Malaysia.

    Looking at the details, as regards Japan, the highest expenditure is other goods and services with 29%. This is followed by food, housing and transport at 24%, 21% and 20% respectively. Japanese households spend the least expenditure on health care at 6%.

    Regarding of Malaysia, the largest expense is the housing at just over one-third of the expenditure. Food and other goods and services are following this with around one-quarter apiece. Only 10% of the money is spent on transport in Malaysia, which is half as expensive as the amount of money Japan spend on transportation. Subsequently, Malaysia spends only 3% on health care, making it the lowest expense among five different household expenditures.

  5. The above pie chart gives us the detailed view of average household expenditure in two different countries namely Japan and Malaysia in the year 2010. They spend their expenditure in various aspects such as Housing, Transport, Food, Health care and other goods and services.
    In Japan, people spent their most of the expenditure on transport. They spent 29% of their income on it. Whereas in Malaysia, people spent 26% of their income on transport. In Malaysia housing had highest expenditure spent on. People spent 34% on it. In Japan, they spent 21% on housing.
    The next important aspect in food. People in both countries spent nearly equal amount on food. People in Japan spent 24% of their income on food whereas, in Malaysia people spent 27%. Coming to health care and other goods and services, percentage of income on it in Japan is doubled to that of Malaysia. On former category Malaysian people spent 3% whereas Japan people spent 6%.Coming to the latter one, people in Malaysia spent 10% of their income whereas Japan people spent 20% of it.
    To conclude, In Malaysia people spent most of their income on transport. Coming to Japan, people spent on housing. Furthermore, amount spent on health care and other goods and services people spent double the percentage of the income compared to that of Malaysia.

  6. The pie charts illustrate the proportion of the average spending in two different countries Japan and Malaysia in year 2010. The units are in percentages.

    Overall,in Japan, other goods and services had the highest spending while housing expenses had the least meanwhile in Malaysia, expenses on housing had the most where as health care had the least in that country as at that year.

    To start with,in 2010, resources spent on other goods and services had the highest in Japan of about 29 percent which later reduced by 2 percent in Malaysia to about 26 percent. Also, this is followed by food expenses which recorded 24 percent in 2010 and increased gradually by 3percent to 27 percent in Malaysia in 2010.

    Furthermore,in 2010 in Japan,the country recorded the least expenses on health care of about 6 percent where as the spending reduced drastically in Malaysia to about 3 percent. The next least expenses was in housing,food which recorded 21percent,24percent respectively meanwhile, housing expenses raised to 34 percent and food increased by 3 percent to 27 percent in Malaysia in 2010.

  7. The two pie graphs illustrate the summary of various home expenses in the year 2010 for two countries Japan and Malaysia.
    Overall, the cost of housing was the major source of spending in Malaysia. In contrast, Japanese households allot most of their income towards several goods and services. Food related expenditures were the second highest in both the countries. Contributions towards health care stayed at a record minimum levels in the two regions.
    A huge share of household income of about 34% was expended for living accommodations in Malaysia. On the other hand, Japanese spent about nearly a third on purchasing goods and services which stood as the largest expense. Though food costs occupied the second highest share, they stood at 27% in Malaysia and just under a quarter in Japan. Differences in the expenses incurred between food and services only varied with a small minority of about 3% in Japan and 1% in Malaysia.
    Malaysians and the Japanese spent a minority share on health care costs. Malaysian people spent only 3% towards health, while the Japanese spent a double of the same portion. Similar pattern is observed in the case of money spent on commute as well. Transport attributed to 10% of the total income of Malaysians, in contrast Japanese spent a little less than a quarter on the same.

  8. The given pie charts provide information about the average spendings on five different categories of Japanese and Malaysian households.
    Overall, it is clear, while expenses on health care represents the smallest shares in both countries, housing and other goods and services account for the major proportions in Malaysia and Japan, respectively.
    Looking at the charts in more detail, it is obvious that a Malaysian citizen spends on average only 3 percentage of the entire expenditures on health care. Whilst that sector is spent on the least too in Japan, the figures are doubled. The pattern is strikingly similar for the category transportation where the proportion being a tenth in Malaysia, is twice as high in Japan.
    A Japanese household’s highest proportion of money goes towards other goods and services, accounting for just under a third, whereas in Malaysia, the figures are slightly lower. Both nations have expenses in relatively similar heights appointed to food with around a quarter. Housing represents the major category in Malaysia reaching figures of 34%, only accounts for around a fifth in Japan.

  9. The pie chart illustrates the household expenditure for five different aspects in Japan and Malaysia for year 2010. These various aspects are Housing, Food, Transport, Health Care and Other goods and services.
    Overall, households in Japan spent most for ‘Other goods and services’ whereas in Malaysia maximum expenditure is for Housing. However, households in both countries spent least for Health Care.
    A family in Japan spent 24% on Food, followed by 21% on Housing. Similarly, a family in Malaysia spent 27% on Food, followed by 26% on ‘Other goods and services’. Transport is the only field for which there’s a huge difference in between figures of both countries, Malaysia household spent 10% whereas Japan household spent its double that is 20%.
    In Malaysia’s household expenditure is highest for Housing (34%). In contrast, highest expenditure for Japan’s household ‘Other goods and services’ (29%). Least expenditure is for Health Care in both countries with 6% in Japan and 3% in Malaysia.

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