IELTS Writing Task 1 (Pie Chart)


You should spend about 20 minutes on this task.

The Pie chart below shows the average household expenditure in Japan and Malaysia in the year 2010.

Summaries the information by selecting and reporting the main features, and make comparisons where relevant.

 

write at least 150 words.

IELTS Writing Task 1 (Pie Chart)

 

 


Answer

 

A glance at the pie charts reveals information about the proportion of money spent on household expenses in Japan and Malaysia in 2010.

Overall, Japan spent the highest amount of money on goods and services where Housing was the highest sector of expenditure in Malaysia. Both countries spent the least amount of money in the Health care sector in 2010.

Japan expenditure the highest amount of money than Malaysia in 3 sectors likely: Other goods and services, Transport, and Health care sectors. Other goods and services were the highest sectors of expenditure in Japan which was 29%, whereas Malaysia spends 26% in this sector. In the transport and Health care sector Japan spends respectively 20% and 6% of its total expenditure which was two-fold in comparison to Malaysia’s expenditure in these sectors.

In sectors like Housing and Food, Malaysia expenditure most than Japan. Housing was the highest sector of expenditure in 2010 which was 34%, meanwhile, Japan spends only 21% on Housing this year. In the Food sector, Malaysia and Japan spend respectively 27% and 24% in 2010.

 

178 Words


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106 thoughts on “”

  1. The graph illustrates in which proportion is money spent by that the population of Japan and Malaysia in the year 2010. The outgoings are classified in five different groups: Housing, Transport, Food, Health care and Other goods and services.

    Overall, in Malaysia the highest percentage is spent in Housing, while in Japan the major expenditure is in Other goods and services. This is at 34% the former and 29% the latter. On the other hand, in both Japan and Malaysia the lowest participation rate corresponds to Health care, with 6% and 3% respectively.

    The second largest category is for both countries Food. While in Japan meal represents 24% of the budget, in Malaysia is at 27%. The third classification in Japan is Housing, whereas in Malaysia is Other goods and services, at 21% and 26% respectively. Finally, the second shortest group belongs to Transport in both Japan and Malaysia, at 10%.

    1. The assigned circular representations depict the information about the spending habits of Japanese and Malaysian towards the five different factors in year 2010.

      While having a quick glance, it is crystal clear that for housing purpose,the residents of Malaysia spent 34% of its total revenue , which was 13% more than Japan.While, in the case of transport, the spending of Japanese was double as contrary to other one , that was one- fifth of total.

      Moving towards the rest of description, it can be seen that the expenditure for food and other services was similar with 27% in Malaysia. But, the difference of 5% was noticed in the case of Japan.However, the citizens of both nations spent insignificant percentile of their total income for health care that was 6 % and 3% respectively.

      From the overall analysis, housing was situated on the top of spending list, while ,health care was considered as a less important in the both given nations.

    2. I think instead of writing graph , you should use the work ‘chart’ or ‘pie chart’ because it is clear that it isn’t a graph.

  2. The pie chart gives information about the percentage of spending on five different categories in both Japan and Malaysia in 2010. Segments are represented by different colors.
    Overall, it is clear that people in Malaysia spent more money for housing while Japanese used more money for transportation rather than people in Malaysia. Japanese are more than 3% in health care in comparison with Malaysia.
    The most spending in Japan was other goods and services at 29%. The spending on health care, was the lowest percentage shown on the figure. The similar proportion can be seen in food, housing and transportation. The percentage of those three sectors were 24%, 21% and 20% respectively.
    Looking at the figure for Malaysia, people who lived in Malaysia spent large amount of money to buy house, at 34%. By contrast, the spending for health was just only 3%. It is also found that 10% of expenditure in transportation and 26% of other goods and services. Furthermore, spending on food, was the second highest expenditure in Malaysia in 2010.

  3. The Pie charts depict the detailed information about the minimum household expenditure in Japan and Malaysia in the year 2010.

    The first pie chart tells us about average household expenditure in Japan in 2010. the percentages of household expenditure in housing, transport, food, health care and other goods and servicies were 21%, 20%, 24%, 6%, and 29% respectively. However, the second pie chart illustrates the information about average household expenditure in Malaysia in 2010 and the percentages of household expenditure in housing, transport, food, health care and other goods and servicies were 34%, 10%, 26%, 3%, and 27% respectively. Furthermore, it can be said that the percentages of transport and health care in Japan is doubled the percentages in Malaysia. Moreover, Japan’s highest percentange in household expenditure is other goods and services but the highest percentange in household expenditure in Malaysia is housing. Moreover, the lowest percentage in household expenditure in Japan and Malaysia is health care.

    Overall, It is clearly visible that the smallest contribution of household expenditure in both the country Japan and Malaysia is same. However, Japan and Malaysia do have their own differences and vice-versa in the percentages of household expenditure.

    Total word = 195

    1. A couple of pie charts illustrate the data on the average domestic expenditure in the year 2010 with comparative data between Japan and Malaysia.
      At a glance, the highest budgetary part was housing in Malaysia. Surprisingly, a health care expenditure was seen at the least in both the countries, however, the Malaysians were lower than Japanese.
      Meticulously, a housing part was consumed by 3% more in Japan than Malaysia. Moreover, a transport expenditure was seemed double in Japan with Malaysia comparatively.
      Additionally, a money was spent on food with less than one percent of quarter and more than two percent of quarter in Japan and Malaysia respectively.
      Next up, not only Japan but also Malaysia was convered a few money on health care with 6% and 3% gradually. At last, 29% of Japanese utilised money on other goods and services while the Malaysians were by 3% less than Japanese with the same services.

  4. The given pie chart illustrates information about the proportion of household expenses in Japan and Malaysia in 2010.

    Overall, what stands out the most is that health care occupies the least percentage in both Malaysia and Japan. Another interesting point is that Japanese households spend money the most on goods and services while housing was the highest expenses in Malaysia.

    Looking at the details, as regards Japan, the highest expenditure is other goods and services with 29%. This is followed by food, housing and transport at 24%, 21% and 20% respectively. Japanese households spend the least expenditure on health care at 6%.

    Regarding of Malaysia, the largest expense is the housing at just over one-third of the expenditure. Food and other goods and services are following this with around one-quarter apiece. Only 10% of the money is spent on transport in Malaysia, which is half as expensive as the amount of money Japan spend on transportation. Subsequently, Malaysia spends only 3% on health care, making it the lowest expense among five different household expenditures.

  5. The above pie chart gives us the detailed view of average household expenditure in two different countries namely Japan and Malaysia in the year 2010. They spend their expenditure in various aspects such as Housing, Transport, Food, Health care and other goods and services.
    In Japan, people spent their most of the expenditure on transport. They spent 29% of their income on it. Whereas in Malaysia, people spent 26% of their income on transport. In Malaysia housing had highest expenditure spent on. People spent 34% on it. In Japan, they spent 21% on housing.
    The next important aspect in food. People in both countries spent nearly equal amount on food. People in Japan spent 24% of their income on food whereas, in Malaysia people spent 27%. Coming to health care and other goods and services, percentage of income on it in Japan is doubled to that of Malaysia. On former category Malaysian people spent 3% whereas Japan people spent 6%.Coming to the latter one, people in Malaysia spent 10% of their income whereas Japan people spent 20% of it.
    To conclude, In Malaysia people spent most of their income on transport. Coming to Japan, people spent on housing. Furthermore, amount spent on health care and other goods and services people spent double the percentage of the income compared to that of Malaysia.

  6. The pie charts illustrate the proportion of the average spending in two different countries Japan and Malaysia in year 2010. The units are in percentages.

    Overall,in Japan, other goods and services had the highest spending while housing expenses had the least meanwhile in Malaysia, expenses on housing had the most where as health care had the least in that country as at that year.

    To start with,in 2010, resources spent on other goods and services had the highest in Japan of about 29 percent which later reduced by 2 percent in Malaysia to about 26 percent. Also, this is followed by food expenses which recorded 24 percent in 2010 and increased gradually by 3percent to 27 percent in Malaysia in 2010.

    Furthermore,in 2010 in Japan,the country recorded the least expenses on health care of about 6 percent where as the spending reduced drastically in Malaysia to about 3 percent. The next least expenses was in housing,food which recorded 21percent,24percent respectively meanwhile, housing expenses raised to 34 percent and food increased by 3 percent to 27 percent in Malaysia in 2010.

    1. The pie chart provides the information about the average household expenses of Japan and Malaysia for the year 2010. The expenditure is presented in percentage.
      Overall, the highest expenses of Japan is for food while the highest expenditure in Malaysia is for Health care services.
      Japan spend more income for 3 sectors than Malayasia, for transport, housing and other good and services. However Malaysia spend more for food and transport. The other good and services sector has highest money spend by Japan that is 29% while Malaysia spend only 26%. In housing and transport Japan spend total 6% and 20% which is two folds more than Malaysia.
      However, for food Malayasia spend 27% of their total earning whereas Japan spend on 24%. In Healthcare sector, Malaysia provided 34% of their country money but Japan only spend 21%.

  7. The two pie graphs illustrate the summary of various home expenses in the year 2010 for two countries Japan and Malaysia.
    Overall, the cost of housing was the major source of spending in Malaysia. In contrast, Japanese households allot most of their income towards several goods and services. Food related expenditures were the second highest in both the countries. Contributions towards health care stayed at a record minimum levels in the two regions.
    A huge share of household income of about 34% was expended for living accommodations in Malaysia. On the other hand, Japanese spent about nearly a third on purchasing goods and services which stood as the largest expense. Though food costs occupied the second highest share, they stood at 27% in Malaysia and just under a quarter in Japan. Differences in the expenses incurred between food and services only varied with a small minority of about 3% in Japan and 1% in Malaysia.
    Malaysians and the Japanese spent a minority share on health care costs. Malaysian people spent only 3% towards health, while the Japanese spent a double of the same portion. Similar pattern is observed in the case of money spent on commute as well. Transport attributed to 10% of the total income of Malaysians, in contrast Japanese spent a little less than a quarter on the same.

  8. The given pie charts provide information about the average spendings on five different categories of Japanese and Malaysian households.
    Overall, it is clear, while expenses on health care represents the smallest shares in both countries, housing and other goods and services account for the major proportions in Malaysia and Japan, respectively.
    Looking at the charts in more detail, it is obvious that a Malaysian citizen spends on average only 3 percentage of the entire expenditures on health care. Whilst that sector is spent on the least too in Japan, the figures are doubled. The pattern is strikingly similar for the category transportation where the proportion being a tenth in Malaysia, is twice as high in Japan.
    A Japanese household’s highest proportion of money goes towards other goods and services, accounting for just under a third, whereas in Malaysia, the figures are slightly lower. Both nations have expenses in relatively similar heights appointed to food with around a quarter. Housing represents the major category in Malaysia reaching figures of 34%, only accounts for around a fifth in Japan.

  9. The pie chart illustrates the household expenditure for five different aspects in Japan and Malaysia for year 2010. These various aspects are Housing, Food, Transport, Health Care and Other goods and services.
    Overall, households in Japan spent most for ‘Other goods and services’ whereas in Malaysia maximum expenditure is for Housing. However, households in both countries spent least for Health Care.
    A family in Japan spent 24% on Food, followed by 21% on Housing. Similarly, a family in Malaysia spent 27% on Food, followed by 26% on ‘Other goods and services’. Transport is the only field for which there’s a huge difference in between figures of both countries, Malaysia household spent 10% whereas Japan household spent its double that is 20%.
    In Malaysia’s household expenditure is highest for Housing (34%). In contrast, highest expenditure for Japan’s household ‘Other goods and services’ (29%). Least expenditure is for Health Care in both countries with 6% in Japan and 3% in Malaysia.

  10. The pie chart depicted Japan and Malaysia’s the average household expenditure by five different parts in 2010.

    Looking firstly at Japan, the most noticeable figures of 29% was discovered in Other goods and services, followed by Food with 24%. Housing and Transport recorded the similar percentage of 21% and precisely 20% respectively. Lastly, the most slight proportion was found in Health care(6%).

    Moving onto Malaysia, Housing occupied the biggest percantage of 34%. Then, Food(27%) and Other goods and services(26%) followed as the similar figures of around quarter of the total. Yet, Transport indicated the second marginal proportion of 10%. Only 3% was recorded in Health care.

    To sum up, Other goods and services, Housing and Food were the major household expenditure sectors, while Transport and Health care were insignificant in both countries.
    (132 words)

  11. The pie chart here demonstartes the average household expenditure of people in two different countries. It shows the statistics of the countries of Japan and Malaysia for the year 2010.

    By observing both the charts keenly, we can see that there is a difference of 3% in the categories other goods and service,health care and food. Japan leads by 3% in the areas of other goods and services and helath care, whereas it is behind by the same percentage in the feild of Food. Also, when we compare the Transport and housing sections of the Pie char its evident that there Japan has invested 10% more on Transport and 13% less in housing, making it 20% and 21% respectively, on the other hand Malaysia has been at 10% and 34% each.

    It is evident that people living in Japan prefer to spend more on goods and services and less on health care, on the other hand Malaysian people prefer to spend more in housing and later being the same. In addition to that, there is a huge difference in the spending fasion of the countries in the Transportion category.

  12. The pie chart gives information about the proportion of the average domestic spending in Japan and Malaysia in 2010.

    In Japan, other goods and services comprised the biggest segment of the spending at 29%. The second biggest part of the chart was food, which made up 24% of the spending. Housing and transport each accounted for around one five of the chars, at 21% and 20% respectively. However, only 6% of the domestic expenditure was spent on Healthcare in Japan.

    On the other hand, Malaysian spend just over one-third of domestic spending on housing. In addition, food and other goods and services made up almost the same segment of the chart, at 27% and 26% respectively. However, transport comprised 10% of the expenditure, which was nearly threefold that of health care.

    Overall, it is clear that while health care was the least significant part of the household spending in both countries, other goods and services made up the largest segment in Japan and housing cost the most in Malaysia.

  13. The charts compare the differences of the average household expenditure between two countries, Japan and Malaysia, in 2010.
    The spending is classified into five different categories: housing, transport, food, health care and other goods and services. Overall, it shows a clear comparison that Malaysia resident spent more in housing than Japan while Japan inhabitant spent more on transport.
    Japan spent the most on goods and services and Malaysia major expenditure is in housing. This is at 29% the former and 34% the latter. Besides, food is the second largest expenditure for both countries. While in Japan food represents 24% of the budget and Malaysia is at 27%. The third classification in Japan and Malaysia respectively are housing and goods and services, with 21% and 26% in-particular.
    On the other hand, the second shortest and the lowest group in both countries are the same, which transport and health care by lot. Japan is 10% higher in transport and 3% higher in health care, at 20% and 6% respectively.

    (167 words)

  14. The pie chart below depicts the spending habits of an average household in the countries of Japan and Malaysia .

    It is visible from the pie chart that the cost of owning or renting a house is very high in Malaysia as the maximum portion of the expenditure is in the housing sector.
    The expenditure in the housing sector in Japan is relatively low and comes in the third position after the expenses in other goods and services and food.

    However , it can be inferred from the chart that the cost of transportation is very high in Japan as the portion of expenditure of an average household in Japan in transport is double of what is spent by a household in Malaysia . The same pattern is visible in the spending for heatlhcare services , with the Japanese population spending 6% of their expenditure for the healthcare compared to the 3% by the Malaysian population .

    Overall the expenditure on Food and Other services and goods takes up a major chunk of spending in both the countries , accounting for over 50% of their total expenditure.

  15. The given charts provides informations about people’s average expense in Japan and Malaysia in the year of 2010.

    Overall, people had a higher expense on housing, food, and other goods and services in both countries while people had a lower expense on medical care and transportation.

    In terms of significant features, the Japanese had the highest expense on other goods and services, which accounted for 29 percents. There was also a relatively high expense on food and housing that is at 24 percents and 21 percents respectively. Together, they made up approximately three-quarter of the total household expense in Japan. In contrast, the Malaysians had most of their money spent on housing, that account for 34 percents. Interestingly, they had nearly the same expense on food and other goods and services which food accounted for 27 percents while other goods and services was only 1 percent lower than it, at 26 percents. Adding them up, they made up 87 percents of the total expense in Malaysia. This evident that housing, food, and other goods and services took up more than half of the total expense in these two countries.

    In regard to the smaller category, Japan had the lowest expense on medical care, which only accounted for 6 percents. Additionally, Japanese also tended to spend less money on the vehicle they use to travel from one place to another, which is at 20 percents. Adding them up, they made up about a quarter of the total expense in Japan. Similarly, Malaysia also has the least amount of money spent on health care, which only accounted for 3 percents. This is trailed by transportation that is merely at 10 percents. Together, they only took up 13 percents of the total expense in Malaysia. On a particular note, health care and transportation had collectively made up less than 30 percents of the total expense in both countries.

  16. The given charts provides informations about people’s average expense in Japan and Malaysia in the year of 2010.

    Overall, people had a higher expense on housing, food, and other goods and services in both countries while people had a lower expense on medical care and transportation.

    In terms of significant features, the Japanese had the highest expense on other goods and services, which accounted for 29 percents. There was also a relatively high expense on food and housing that is at 24 percents and 21 percents respectively. Together, they made up approximately three-quarter of the total household expense in Japan. In contrast, the Malaysians had most of their money spent on housing, that account for 34 percents. Interestingly, they had nearly the same expense on food and other goods and services which food accounted for 27 percents while other goods and services was only 1 percent lower than it, at 26 percents. Adding them up, they made up 87 percents of the total expense in Malaysia. This evident that housing, food, and other goods and services took up more than half of the total expense in these two countries.

    In regard to the smaller category, Japan had the lowest expense on medical care, which only accounted for 6 percents. Additionally, Japanese also tended to spend less money on the vehicle they use to travel from one place to another, which is at 20 percents. Adding them up, they made up about a quarter of the total expense in Japan. Similarly, Malaysia also has the least amount of money spent on health care, which only accounted for 3 percents. This is trailed by transportation that is merely at 10 percents. Together, they only took up 13 percents of the total expense in Malaysia. On a particular note, health care and transportation had collectively made up less than 30 percents of the total expense in both countries.

  17. The given pie charts depict the average household expenditure in Japan and Malaysia in 2010.On an average the people in Malaysia tend to spend a higher share of their income on housing whereas the people in Japan spend more on other unknown goods and services.
    In Malaysia the amount spent on food (27%) comes to around one third of the total expenses followed closely by other expenses on goods and services(26%) by a difference of just one percent. Malaysians tend to spend the least on transportation, constituting 10 percent of their total expenditure, which is preceded by expenses on healthcare (3 percent).
    In Japan more than one fourth of the total expenses are spent on food(24%) followed by housing facilities which contribute to 21 percent of the average cumulative expense. The cost spent on transport(20%) and healthcare(6%) are doubled in Japan when compared to the average amount spent by Malaysians on the respective sectors.
    Summarizing the information given, both Japan and Malaysia tend to spend a fair share of income on food, contrary to the fact they spend the least on health care.

  18. pie chart gives information about household expenditures of Japan and Malaysia. The proportion was given by five sectors which defines use of that particular sector.
    In Japan proportion was 29% for other good and services and then 24% for food, 21% for housing , 20% for transport and 6%for healthcare. In Japan highest priority was given to other goods and service among all sectors. When we check Malaysia it has 26% for other goods and service , 27% for food, 34% for housing,10% for transport and 3% for health care. Malaysia has highest priority for housing sector among all sectors. When we compare both sectors food and goods and service proportion have some similar percentage. They have drastic differences in housing sector people in Malaysia has given more importance to housing.
    In both countries healthcare has least priority in common .Both countries have significant differences in usage of sectors based on their life style which reflects in proportion.

  19. Pie chart gives information about household expenditures of Japan and Malaysia. The proportion was given by five sectors which defines use of that particular sector.
    In Japan proportion was 29% for other good and services and then 24% for food, 21% for housing , 20% for transport and 6%for healthcare. In Japan highest priority was given to other goods and service among all sectors. However, When we check Malaysia it has 26% for other goods and service , 27% for food, 34% for housing,10% for transport and 3% for health care. Therefore, Malaysia has highest priority for housing sector among all sectors. When we compare both sectors food and goods and service proportion have some similar percentage. They have drastic differences in housing sector people in Malaysia has given more importance to housing.
    In both countries healthcare has least priority in common .Both countries have significant differences in usage of sectors based on their life style which reflects in proportion.

  20. The pie charts presented captures the data describing the average amount of money spent on house related stuffs by the people of two specific countries(Japan and Malaysia) annually.
    Broadly speaking, natives of both the country spent almost similar proportion of money on all the basic activities.But in accordance with the chart,Japan counts to lead in spending more on other goods and extra services while Malaysians found to spent more on housing.On contrary, both the countries spent least on health related issues.
    A specific analysis revealed that besides spending highest on other services with 29%, Japanese spent almost same amount of money on other three major activities likely 5% less from the highest on food whereas slightly decreased by 4% on transport facilities and merely 1% less on house related things.Expenditure on health issues found to be the least with just 6%.
    Regarding Malaysians spending more on making their house better to slight difference of 8% on other facilities and approximately same amount on eateries is noticed. On a final note, commute facilities found to consume merely 10 % of money while likewise 7% less expenditure is observed in the health related facilities among the country.

  21. The two pie graphs clearly illustrate the information regarding average household spending on five categories including housing, transport, food, health care, and other goods and services in two countries; Japan and Malaysia in 2010. It is noticeable from the graphs that people spent the least on health care in both countries.

    In detail, it can be seen that, in Japan, there was a largest proportion of spending on other goods and services accounted for 29%. The percentage of expenditure on food (24%) was the second highest followed by that on housing account for 21%. The amount that Japanese people paid out for transport was just 1% less than that in housing. For the least portion, health care spending, it occupied only 6% of total amount which was totally different from other categories.

    Similarly, Malaysian least spent on health care which makes up for 3% of total expenditure. Moreover, the second least amount was also the proportion of spending on transport (10%) while the figure of that on housing contributed to the most at 34% followed by the amount on food and that on other goods and services which are 27% and 26 % of total respectively.

  22. The pie charts provide information about the average household expenditure in the countries Japan and Malaysia in 2010.

    Both Japan and Malaysia spent almost the same amount of money in food sector and on other goods and services. Meanwhile, for the health care and transport sector, Japan’s expenditure is twice as much as that of Malaysia.

    The highest expenditure in Malaysia is in housing, which is 34 percent, while, on the other hand, Japan only spent 21 percent on that.

    Overall, people in Malaysia spent most of their money on housing, and as of Japan, the highest expenditure was in the sector of goods and other services. In addition, both the countries had the minimum expenditure in health care.

  23. The pie charts illustrate the mean value of 4 household and other goods and services spending and payment in each of Japan and Malaysia in the year 2010.
    Overall, at the first glance it seems that housing and health care were the most and least popular expenditure respectively in both Japan and Malaysia. The information was presented as the average of each household spending as the total expenditure.
    In terms of the biggest three comprising sectors in the two mentioned countries, housing was at the top making up more than fifth in Japan and about a third in Malaysia. Furthermore, food was the second largest paid household in Malaysia followed by other goods and services. Unlike Japan where they were reversed in order (29% for other goods and services and 24% for food).
    On the other hand, transport and health were the least contributing to the total expenditure with 20% and 6% respectively in Japan, and their exact half in Malaysia.

  24. The pie charts illustrate the mean value of 4 household and other goods and services spending and payment in each of Japan and Malaysia in the year 2010.

    Overall, at the first glance it seems that housing and health care were the most and least popular expenditures respectively in both Japan and Malaysia. The information was presented as the average of each household spending as the total expenditure.

    In terms of the biggest three comprising sectors in the two mentioned countries, housing was at the top making up more than fifth in Japan and about a third in Malaysia. Furthermore, food was the second largest paid household in Malaysia followed by other goods and services. Unlike Japan where they were reversed in order (29% for other goods and services and 24% for food).

    On the other hand, transport and health were the least contributing to the total expenditure with 20% and 6% respectively in Japan, and their exact half in Malaysia.

  25. the pie chart below shows the average household expenditure in japan and malaysia in the year 2010.

    This pie chart represents various expenses which were spent by population of japan and malaysia on five different categories in 2010.

    Overall, highest sent proportion of spending rate were seeing among the housing in japan and malaysia, while least percentage of money were spent in fitness category.

    In terms of houses, which made up the highest contribution in malaysia (34%),however, japanese people accounted for 21%. Food, got the second greatest percentage in both japan and malaysia which was approximately similar(24% and 27% respectively).In contrast, spending on consumption of other goods and services was 29% in japan, compared to malaysia which was slightly less in malaysia(26%).

    Investment on health care system by population of malaysia was 3% which got doubled in japan 6%. People of malaysia spent money on transportation was 10%,but one-fifth amount of money was the spending rate in japan.

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  26. Both pie charts display the average household expenses in both Malaysia and Japan in 2010.

    Overall, a majority of spending in both countries is witnessed in three sectors: Other goods and services, housing and food. Minor spending is seen in the transport and healthcare sectors.

    It is evident that a majority of Malaysians, 34% to be specific, are focused on housing expenditures compared to a smaller figure of 21% of Japanese households. On the other hand, spending on other goods and services in both countries is almost equivalent, with 26% of Malaysians and 29% of Japanese households spending in the aforementioned sector. Similarly, a relatively equal number of Malaysian and Japanese households, 27% of Malaysians and 24% of Japanese to be exact.

    Alternatively, a minor proportion of 10% of all Malaysian households spent on transport, whilst a slightly larger 20% of all Japanese households spent on transport. Even smaller still is the 3% of Malaysian households along with 6% of Japanese households who spent on healthcare.

  27. The pie chart provides the information about the annual expanse in a household in the form of percentage by Japan and Malaysia in the the year 2010
    Overall, we can see that in Japan other goods and services contain the highest percentage. On the other side in Malaysia had most preferences to housing. Beside of it Health care was the lowest in both the countries.
    Firstly, In Japan other goods and services had 29% of profit it was the greatest among all. We have food consumed by 24% in day-to-day life. Additionally housing and transport contain 20 and 21 percentage in Japanese people life. Finally 6 percentage used for health care.
    Secondly, In Malaysia housing had gain 34% by the year 2010. Therefore food was the second most used product in the country with 27%. On the other hand, transport and other goods and services had percentage of 26 and 10 respectively. Lastly, health care had least usage by 3% only.

  28. The pie chart is giving information about the money spent on different sectors of household expenses in the year 2010 in two different countries Japan and Malaysia.With the help of this pie chart one can get a very clear view of average household expenditure in both the countries and also a comparison can be made very easily.
    As we can see in the chart that average expenditure on housing in Malaysia is 13% (29% – 26%)more than Japan, which means in Malaysia people spent good amount of their incomes on housing in comparison to Japan, but it is reverse in the case of transport .In Japan 20% money is spent on transport , while in Malaysia it is 10%, which means in Malaysia the household expenditure on transport is 50% less than Japan.
    If we talk about the expenses of food in both the countries,then their is no big difference . Looking at the pie chart we can clearly say that people in Malaysia spent a little bit more amount of their incomes on food in comparison to Japan ,as the difference of percentage is only 3%.
    Health,one of major aspects of our life, according to the given pie chart both the countries spent least on healthcare as the percentage of healthcare expenses in Japan is only 6% and in Malaysia it is only 3%. Now if we see the expenses of other goods and services in both the countries ,there is no big difference,the percentage of household expenditure on other goods and services in Japan is 29% while in Malaysia it is 26%, which means people in Japan spent a little bit more amount on other goods and services in comparison to Malaysia.

  29. The pie chart compares the average household expenditures on housing,transport,food,health care and on other goods and services in Japan and Malaysia in the year 2010.

    The chart clearly depicts that in Malaysia, the housing covers the most expense while the least is for healthcare. On the contrary, in Japan the highest is for other goods and services and the lowest is the same as Malaysia, that is for healthcare.

    In Malaysia housing accounts for 34% which is moderately higher than that in Japan(21%) whereas the expense for food and other goods and service are almost identical in both the countries. 10% of the expense goes for transport in Malaysia while it is 20 % in Japan which is slightly higher. However the expense contributed to helathcare by both the countries is minimal.

  30. The above-outlined illustration portrays the unique areas of expenditure in families residing in Japan and Malaysia. It depicts the general economic and financial overview of the two countries and outlines the contrasts and connections between priorities.
    In Malaysia, about one-third (34%) of the entire income is spent on housing, followed by 27% on food. And, here we stumble upon a similarity in the expenditure pattern of families residing in the two nations. In Japan, housing and food account for 21% and 24% of the income. This provides evidence that basic human necessities, that are key for sustenance are always the top priority for any family. The contrast in magnitude signifies another prospect, which is the economic progression of each sovereign nation.
    Japanese families spend a greater fraction of their income on healthcare and transport, 6% and 20% respectively, in contrast to Malaysian families allocating only 3% and 10% respectively. This indicates that the entire economic framework has allowed Japanese families to focus on health and mobility, and therefore enjoy a better quality of life compared to Malaysian families. This is owed to development in the economy which has allowed such opportunities.
    Therefore, Japan, through its expenditure patterns has shown that it is a developed nation, while Malaysia is a developing country that aims to climb the ladder of well-being in the long run.

  31. The given pie chart depicts the average family spending in Japan and Malaysia in the year 2010.
    Firstly, both in Japan and Malaysia, a lion share of family expense goes towards transportation, which stands at 29% and 26% respectively. Nevertheless, in case of healthcare family circles in Malaysia spend almost 34%, which is so humegous, compared to 21% in Japan.
    People in Japan spends double the amount of what is been spend by the mass of Malaysia, in case of transport. An alike trend is seen in the case of housing, where the expense of housing is 6% in Japan, Malaysia only account half of this percentage. When it comes to food the spending of Malaysian homes contributes 27%, that is 3% greater than in comparison to a Japanese household.
    To wrap up, Housing, goods and sources as well as food, are the areas where families in both Japan and Malaysia spend major share of their money in. An exception for this is seen in Japan where there is sufficiently large expenditure on Transport. In contrast to this, the proportion of expenditure on health care in both nations, together with the fraction of expense on transport in Malaysia is lower.

  32. The given pie chart illustrates the proportion of household outlay on Housing, Transport, Food, Health care and Other goods and services in Japan and Malaysia in the year 2010.
    In Japan, Japanese spent a fifth of its income in Transportation and Housing. Just over a quarter expenditure was in other goods and services which is the maximum. Spending in Health care is minimal in comparison with others, 24% of the expenses was of food in Japan.
    In Malaysia, Malaysian spent a third of its expense in accommodation. Apart from this, Food and Other goods and services are the second most expense for them which accounted for about 26%. Spending money in Transport was 10% in Malaysia, whereas Expense in health care was iota in Malaysia.
    Overall, The Major difference between both countries expense was seen in the field of Housing. Other than these, There was not much difference in expenses.

  33. The pie chart exhibits apropos of the usages for the house chores in the nations of Japan and Malaysia in the year of 2010 . The average costs were determined based on the percentages’ form .The congruent information amidst the twos is that the health care or nursing was diametrically lower than the other issues .In Japan , the loots utilized on each field excluding the former were equivalent ,however ; the housing utilization’ s costs were superabundant great in Malaysia .

    Approximately , nearly one-fourth of the space was consumed by the food in Japan . In 2010 , the transport was not as crucial as the prior one so its percentage hit the inflexion of twenty percentages . In a akin way , the possession of housing accessories’ money was 21 percent and only a number beat the transport .The health services were not too necessitated so a thumb of space is intended for it . Other goods and commodities owned ridiculously close to 30 percent .

    Malaysia ‘s transport , of course , used only half of expenditures concentrated on it where japan is . Obviously , the housing needs were paramount huger in Malay than in Japan . The two ones were not disparate in the case of food . Nevertheless , the gap betwixt the nations in other appurtenances stroke 3 percent .For health warmth , it was still not yuppified .

    To wrap up , the citizens of two nations mainly used appropriately and enormously to feast and to facilitate the homes with others services .Transport was more costly in Japan , nevertheless ; for Malaysia , the housing rudimental uses were more powerful in 2010 . The two countries only needed normally a very bit piece of costs for health care and charging in hospitals or surgeries .

  34. A Lakshmi Yasodhara

    The pie chart represents a summary of the average household expenditure in two different countries, Japan and Malaysia, in the year 2010.
    Overall, Japan has spent the highest amount of money on other goods and services. Whereas, Malaysia has spent the highest amount of money in the housing sector. Both the countries spent the least amount of money on the housing sector.
    The amount of money Japan spent in the transportation sector is twice as Malaysia. Also, health care expenditure in Japan is as twice that of Malaysia’s. There is a vast difference in the housing sector expenditure. Food & other goods and services expenditure is almost same in both the countries.

  35. The given chart compares the average spending done by the people of Japan and Malaysia on five different things namely Housing, transport, Food, Health care, and other goods and services.
    It can be seen from the chart that people of Malaysia spend more on Housing whereas people living in Japan spend most of their capital on other goods and services. Both the countries share the similar interest in investing their capital in Health care which is about 3% for Malaysia and 6% for Japan.
    In Japan about 20% of people spend their money on Transport service which is exactly twice the amount of people compared to Malaysia. The difference in the expenditure for other goods and services is only 3% between both the countries. This difference of 3% is also seen in the expenditure for Food. Expenditure for Housing purpose is very different in Malaysia compared to Japan. The difference of expenditure is about 13% which is the highest compared to all the other expenditure.

  36. The given Pie charts provide information about the average household expenditure in countries, Japan and Malaysia, in the year 2010.
    Upon close observation, it is clear that a large portion of household spending goes to housing in both the countries, but it is more in Malaysia than in Japan, at 34 and 21 percent, respectively. Another high expenditure is in Transport in both countries, with 29% in Japan and 26% in Malaysia. People in both countries also spend large portions of their budget on food, at 27% and 24% in Malaysia and Japan, respectively.
    The statistic where both countries differ greatly is in, Goods and Services, in which the Japanese spend 20%, and the Malaysian spend only half of it. There is a minor expenditure in both countries, in Health care, with about 6% in Japan and 3% in Malaysia.

  37. The pie chart here illustrates the expenditure of Japan and Malaysia in different sectors for the same year. One similarity which can be easily depicted is in Other goods and services sector for both nation where each of them have spent around 29% by Japan and 26% by Malaysia and another similarity is seen in the food sector where expenditure by Malaysia is three percent more as compare to Japan.
    Japan have invested double as compare to Malaysia in two sectors namely health care and transport. These statics shows a higher demand of transport in Japan and it is evident from the news shown about subways in Japan. How pack they are and there are special appointed people whose main role is to push passenger into the trains so that doors can close easily.
    On a contrary Malaysia is having higher expenditure scale compare to Japan in Food and Housing sector. If both nations take a step to change this chart by decreasing expenditure in Other goods and service and food and rather use that in health sector can result in betterment of their respective citizens,

  38. The pie chart illustrates the expends of household appliances in both Japan and Malaysia during 2010. Overall, housing is the greatest expenditure in Malaysia while food claims the largest portion of expends in Japan.
    In term of Japan’s chart, 21% was its proportion for housing expenditure. As well as this, they also spent a fifth of their expend for transportation and 24% for provisions. Nevertheless, health care stretched to 6% in total while the remaining 29% was for other goods and services.
    Turning to Malaysia, food and housing were the most expensive part, costing them over 60% in total with the former accumulating 27% and the latter eating up 34%. Transport was their third most concerning aspect as its expenditure was a tenth of the general expend which was only half as much as Japan’s figure. Similar to this, health care in Malaysia was utterly averaging 3% in total with the rest being spent on other factors.
    In conclusion, Japan’s largest proportion was food while it was housing that claimed this position in Malaysia. Last but not least, they share the same concern about health services as they are the least expenditures out of the five aspects.

  39. The pie chart above depicts the 2010 average household expenditure of two countries, in areas of transport, housing, food, healthcare and other goods and services.
    The highest household expenditure in Japan are other goods, followed by food, housing, and health care with 24%, 21%, 20% and 6% respectively. While the highest household expenditure in Malaysia is Housing, followed by Food, other goods, transport, and health care with 34%, 27%, 26%, 10%, and 3% respectively.
    This shows that expenditure on other goods and housing are relatively the highest in both countries, food and transportation are on the average, while health care remains the lowest household expenditure in both countries. However, in comparison between both countries, Housing remains the highest household expenditure with 34%.
    In conclusion, in 2010, people spent more on Housing than other household expenditure.

  40. The set of pie charts illustrates proportion of consumption in five different types household by citizens of Japan and Malasiya in 2010.

    overall , it can be seen that Japanese spent more money in other goods and services ;while, transportation was the first priority for Malasians. Moreover, in both contries expenditure bon health care was the lowest.

    On the one hand, people of Japan spent most of their money on transportation, health care and other goods and services than Malsians. To begin with, in transportation facility Japanese used double amount than Malasiya, which was 20%.Again, expenditure on health care was two-fold (6%) in Japan than Malasiya (3%). Consumption in Other goods and services in Japan was 29%;however, people of Malasiya spent 26%; which was 3% lesser than Japan.

    On the other hand, citizens of Malasiya liked to spend their money in food items and accommodation. In hone facilities, Malasiya spent maximum proportion of money at 34%;whereas,nearly one-fifth money spent by Japanese. Similarly, 27% income of malasians gone in food;although people of Japan spent nearly a quarter , which was 24%.

  41. The given pie charts elucidate various expenses incurred in Japanese and Malaysian households.

    Housing, Transport, Food, Health Care, Miscellaneous goods data has been provided in the pie charts. Overall, it can be noted that Japanese spent way less portion of their income on housing compared to Malaysians, however difference between expenditures on food are not that significant with Japanese spending almost a quarter of their income on food. Similarly, expenditure difference of miscellaneous household goods and services is not that far apart either.

    Furthermore, Japanese spent exactly twice as much as Malaysians on transport and Healthcare as well. Necessary amenities Housing and Food expenses are less than half of expenses incurred in Japan although that amount is more than three fifth in Malaysia. Both the countries spent least amount of their income on healthcare followed by transportation even though even though expenditures for both were twice as high in Japan compared to Malaysia.

  42. The Given Pie chart represents the average expenses of households in two island nations likely Japan and Malaysia in the period of 12 months of the year 2010.

    Overall, by examining the two charts we can see that these two countries have their own expenses according to their need, For instance, Japan is spending more on the sector of Other goods and services whereas Malaysia was spending the highest in the sector of housing. Apart from that, both countries have their least expenditures in the Health care sector in the year 2010.

    In terms of Malaysians, they are lagging behind the Japanese in dissipation of money in their 3 sectors likely: Other goods and services, Transport and healthcare . Japan spends respectively 20% and 6% of its total expenditure on healthcare which was two-fold in comparison to Malaysia’s expenditures. The element of contrast in outlaying money between these two countries is the housing sector.

    Taking everything into account, Japan’s biggest extent was the food sector while it was housing that guaranteed this situation in Malaysia. To wrap things up, they share a similar worry about healthcare services they are minimal expenditures out of the five things.

  43. The chart gives information on the average household expenditure in Japan and Malaysia in the year 2010. The information includes housing, transport, food, healthcare, and other goods and services.

    In the pie chart, we can see that above 25% of the expenditure goes to transportation in both the countries which is the highest expense for japan’s household; whereas in Malaysia it is the second-highest. Housing is the highest expense with 34% of the total expenditure spent in Malaysian households. However, Japan’s household spends only 21% of its expenses on housing which is less than Malaysia.

    Japan and Malaysia have some similarities. Food is the second highest expenditure in both the countries household; which is 24% in Japan and 27% in Malaysia. Also, Health care is least expensive with the former spending 6% and later household 3% respectively. Other goods and services take up 20 % of expenditure in Japan and 10% in Malaysia.

  44. The two pie charts illustrate the proportions of money spent on five different categories by Japanese and Malaysian families in 2010.
    Looking at the charts, it is immediately obvious that the majority of money was used for other goods and services and food in Japan, while housing and food registered the highest figures in Malaysia. The lowest percentage was in health care in both countries.
    In Japan, the amount of money spent on other goods and services was highest, accounting for 29%, followed by 24% on food. About a fifth of expenditure was used for each of 2 categories of housing and transport, while only 6% for health care purposes.
    In Malaysia, housing experienced the highest proportion of 34%. The percentages for food and other goods and services were fairly similar, at about a quarter. Least expenditure was spent on transport and health care purposes, with only 10% and 3% respectively.

  45. The two pie charts illustrate the proportions of money spent on five different categories by Japanese and Malaysian families in 2010.

    Looking at the charts, it is immediately obvious that the majority of expenses was used for other goods and services and food in Japan, while housing and food registered the highest figures in Malaysia. The lowest percentage was in health care in both countries.

    In Japan, the amount of money spent on other goods and services was highest, accounting for 29%, followed by 24% on food. About a fifth of expenditure was used for each of 2 categories of housing and transport, while only 6% for health care purposes.

    In Malaysia, housing experienced the highest proportion of 34%. The percentages for food and other goods and services were fairly similar, at about a quarter. Least outlay was spent on transport and health care purposes, with only 10% and 3% respectively.

  46. The given diagram illustrates information about the proportion of money spent on household purposes in Japan and Malaysia in 2010. The graph considers five areas which are housing, food, transport, health care and other goods and services/

    In general, 29% of the money was expended on goods and services by Japanese people which is the highest. Meanwhile, Malaysians spent more than one-third of their money on housing, which is the greatest amount. Both country paid the least for health care, accounting for no more than 10%.

    Japan used 21% on housing, while in Malaysia people spent one and a half times more than Japan. Japanese people and Malaysians paid almost the same proportion on goods and services, with 29% and 26% respectively. The same thing goes for the food sector, both countries spent around one-fourth. In the mean time, Japan used 20% of the total amount on transport, twice as much as the portion of Malaysia.

  47. Allen K Kuriachan

    The pie chart illustrates average percentage of money spent on various household items namely housing, transport, food, health care, other goods and services in the year 210 in two countries Japan and Malaysia.

    Overall, Malaysia spent more money on housing services than Japan in the given period. Japan invested most of their expenditure on other goods and services and Malaysia spent most of their money on housing whereas the least amount of money was spent on health Care by both countries. Furthermore the most significant difference in expenditure between the two countries was on housing.

    In terms of other goods and services, people in the Japan spent about 29% on this opposed to 26% in Malaysia. Similarly , Japanese expenses on transport and health care was twice higher than that Malaysia expenditure around 20% and 10% respectively for transport and 6% and 3% respectively for health.

    On the other hand , the amount of money paid out on remaining items was higher in Malaysia. 34 % was spent on housing by Malaysia which was more than double of the money spent by Japan (21%).Neither of the countries spent much on health care.

  48. The pie chart represents the expenses related to families in Japan and Malaysia in the year 2010.
    As shown in the chart, housing accounted for 21% of total household expenditure in Japan, while that was 34% in Malaysia. Furthermore, Transport expenditure was calculated 20% in Japan along with 10% in Malaysia. In the same way, Food expenses were ascertained 24% of total expenditure in Japan as well as 27% in Malaysia.
    On the other hand, Health care expenses were surprisingly low in both countries such was recorded only 6% in Japan and mere 3% in Malaysia. Accordingly, expenses on other goods and services were, unexpectedly higher in Japan as well in Malaysia with 29% and 26% respectively of total expenditure.
    In conclusion, it is evident that other goods and services altogether food expenditure made significant contribution in household expenditure in both Japan and Malaysia, while Health care sector was the least spent sector of total expenditure in both countries.

  49. The chart compares the average money spent by the people of Japan and Malaysia across different household activities in the year 2020.

    Overall,Japanese people spent more money on Healthcare,transportation and other small activities whereas,the people of Malaysia tend to have higher expenditure on Housing and food.

    In the year 2010, Japanese spent almost 20 per cent of their income on transportation as compared to just 10 per cent by the people of Malaysia.Their 6 per cent income goes out on healthcare and 29 per cent on other goods and services. On the contrary,people of Malaysia spend just 3 per cent on healthcare and just 26 per cent on extras.

    People residing in Malaysia spend huge chunk of their money on housing. Almost 34 per cent of their income goes out on housing as compared to just 21 per cent by the Japanese.They also spend a large amount of their income on food with their almost 27 per cent of their income going out in this category. On the other hand,the people of Japan spend only 24 per cent on food.

  50. Both pie charts describe the rate of home expenses in five different categories by japan and malaysia in 2010.

    Overall, Both countries were less interested in housing compared to other options while Malaysia concentrated more on housing but Japanese spend their highest point in other goods and services.

    Costing on health care as well as other goods and services were 3% greater than malaysia where both countries met their lowest expenditure point on prior one category but Japan made highest costing record by 29% in later category which was 26% for malaysia. Besides, Japan was also ahead by 10% of expenditure in transport compared to malaysia.

    On the other hand, with the percentage of 34% Malaysia invested their maximum money in housing which was more than one third of their total costing and 13% greater than Japan. They were also slightly ahead in food expenditure by 3% than Japan(27% for malaysia and 24% for Japan).

  51. The pie chart illustrates the average domestic expenditure in Japan and Malaysia in 2010. Expenses included in the diagram are Housing, Transport, Food, health care etc.
    The Japanese spend the most for transport whilst people in Malaysia consider Housing as the major expenditure. Both nations use their money for health care in the least amounts of their overall monthly budget. Food is the area for which similar kind of expenses are observed in case of Malay and Japanese crowd. Based on the percentages of money used, it is clearly evident that houses in Japan are cheaper and more economical.
    However, transportation charges in Malaysia is way less than the same in Japan, and this indicates infrastructures are efficient and convenient for public. Miscellaneous spending also is not much different in these countries since rate of spends are in similar quantity.
    In conclusion, Japan is ideal for renting or owning a house rather than in Malaysia. Although, Malaysian transport facilities are less costlier than in Japan dietary expenses are slightly higher.

  52. The two pie charts give information about household expenditure on goods and services in Japan and Malaysia in 2010. It is obvious that there are quite significant differences between the two charts.
    The most remarkable distinctions about household expenditure between the two countries were in the transportation and health care fields. Whether Japanese people spent more money on these services or they were more expensive in Japan than in Malaysia, it is evident that the percentage was twice more than that of for Malaysia in both sections. Nevertheless, more proportion was allocated to transportation in both countries than health care. Moreover, the total household budget went towards housing was higher in Malaysia (34%) compared to Japan (21%) in 2010.
    There are some similarities, however. It seems that the food consumption pattern was approximately the same in both countries with 24% in Japan and 27% in Malaysia. This figure was almost analogous for other goods and services in both countries by 29% for the former and 26% for the latter.

  53. The proportion of household expenses made on different purposes in Japan and Malaysia during 2010 is depicted by the pie chart.

    Overall, the maximum expenditure in 2010 was utilized on housing in Malaysia, whereas in Japan it was spent on other goods and services. On the other hand, the percentage of money allocated on health care was the least in both.

    At first, more amount of expenses were consumed on other goods and services by Japan, their proportion was accounted for 29%; however, only a fifth from overall expenditure was spent on transport. In Malaysia, more than a third of proportion was spent on housing. Meanwhile, 26% and 27% money was expended on other items and services and Food respectively.

    Moving further, by Japan, on the food consumption, the amount utilized was 24%, somehow on housing it was less by 3%. Apparently, the percentage of spending on health care was just 6, but in the second nation the spending’s proportion was plummet by 3.

    Total words= 165

  54. Through the pie charts, we can visualise the household expenditure in Japan and Malaysia respectively. It is divided into different array of segments namely- housing, transport, food, heath care, other goods and services.
    We can see here the percentage of expenditure across different segments varies in both the countries. One common pattern in the expenditure is that the least amount was spent on transport and healthcare.
    In Japan there is a significant amount of expenditure on other goods and services comprising 29% amongst the others. This is followed by food holding a share of 24% in the total expenditure. The least expenditure out of the top three expenditures is housing with a 21% share. In Malaysia comparatively the case is opposite, out of the three top expenditures, the least one in Japan is the highest in Malaysia. Housing takes over a huge part of the overall expenditures in 2010. It is seceded by food which occupies 27% in the total proportion of money spent. Lastly, the 26% is a result of other goods and services.

  55. The pie chart reveals the information about the
    proportion of money spent for household expenditure
    in Japan and Malaysia in the year of 2010.
    Japan spent highest amount of money for other goods and services
    it was 29% whereas Malyasia spent only 26% of money for this sector.
    in other hand Malaysia expenditure to Housing sector was highest which was 34%
    However japan spent 21% of money for this sector.
    but both countries spent less amount for health care sector.
    Japan expenditure for Transport (20%)and Health care (6%)it was this total amount
    two-fold expenditure compare to Malaysia’s expenditure for these sector.
    Those two countries almost had same percentage of money spent for food category
    that is japan spent 24% and Malaysia spent 27% for those sector.
    Overall the chart illustrates that Japan spent highest amount of money for three sectors
    than Malaysia such as other goods and services, Tranport and Healthcare.

  56. The pie-charts illustrate how different household services contribute to the average expenditure spent percentage-wise for Japan and Malaysia during the year 2010.

    Overall, the Healthcare sector contributed the least to the household expenditure in both Japan and Malaysia. The major contributor to household expenditure was other goods and services in Japan and Housing in Malaysia.

    Other goods and services, Housing, and Food, are the three sectors that played an essential role in household expenditure for Japan and Malaysia. In Japan, Other goods and services accounted for 29% of the spending, followed by Food at 24% and Housing at 21%. Meanwhile, in Malaysia, the Housing service is in the lead comprising almost 34%, with Food at 27% and Other goods and services at 26% as second and third lead respectively.

    Of the five sectors, the remaining two sectors Transport and Construction played a minor role in household expenditure compared to the other three sectors. For Japan Transport and Construction was 20% and 6% respectively with Construction hardly contributing and in Malaysia, the two services made an even lower contribution with 10% for Transport and 3% for Construction.

  57. The chart compares the average household expenditure in Japan and Malaysia in the year 2010. Both Japanese and Malaysian spent the least amount of money on health care and almost the same percentage of income on food and other goods and services.
    While Malaysians spent 3 percent and 10 percent on health care and transport respectively, Japanese spent 6 percent and 20 percent respectively which is twice the percentage than that of Malaysian households.
    Malaysians spent 3 percent more on food than Japanese while they spent 3 percent more on other goods and services. Malaysians spent significantly more on housing than Japanese. Most part of the Malaysian household expenditure went to housing while for Japanese it was the other goods and services that Japanese spent most on in the year 2010.
    Overall, both the countries’ household’s expenditure was more or less the same except for the housing department.

  58. This char illustrates percentage of household expenses in Japan and Malaysia during year 2010. A comprehensive analysis of data and comparison between the parameters depicted will be made in this essay.

    The plot explains what percentage of expenses an average house had spent on housing, transport, food, health care and other goods and services in Malaysia and Japan. The expenses are shown in percentage in form of various colors in the pie-chart.

    In Malaysia, the highest expense a house makes is on Housing which is 34 % while in Japan other goods and services consumes the most money, accounting to 29 % of total household expenses. It seems like people in Japan spends more on healthcare contributing to 6% of their expenses as compared to 3% in Malaysia.

    Expenses on transport in Malaysia are half as compared to Japan, such that 10% of total average household expenditure. Malaysia spends marginally higher on food as compared to Japan.

  59. The Pie Charts Provides information about the total money spent on different kind of households in the year of 2010 in two country Japan and Malaysia.
    Overall, Compared to other type of households a very least amount was spent on Healthcare in both the country in 2010. Whereas, In Japan More Money spent on other goods and Services while Housing had more expenditure in Malaysia.
    In Japan 6% of total money spent on Healthcare while other goods and services required five times higher expenditure. But in Malaysia compared to Japan , 13% higher expenses observed on Housing and opposite case for healthcare expense noted which was 3% lower than in Japan in 2010.
    The Money Spent on Food and Transport was 24% and 20% respectively in Japan. Likewise , for the same households in Malaysia it was 27% and 10% respectively. In Japan Transport required 10% higher amount than Malaysia in year 2010. Both the Country Spent half of the total expenditure on Housing and other goods and Services. simultaneously other half includes Healthcare, Food and Transport.

  60. The pie chart below shoes the average household expenditure in Japan and Malaysia in the year 2010.

    The pie chart illustrates the percentage of household expenditure in both countries in one year. Generally, three cases were the highest percentages in Japan and Malaysia.

    In both countries, other goods and services, food and housing were much more that they were 29%, 24% and 21% in Japan and 26%, 27% and 34% in Malaysia respectively. But amount of percentage of housing in Malaysia was higher than Japan.

    In Malaysia, transport and health care were half of Japan. The percentage of transport and health care were 20% and 6% in Japan and also 10% and 3% in Malaysia respectively.

    Overall, in both countries the highest the average household expenditure was housing, food and other goods and services in the year 2010.

  61. The pie chart illustrates household expenses in the year 2010 in Japan and Malaysia. Five areas such as housing, transport, other goods and services, food and health care are taken into consideration. It is quite evident from the chart that food is a major area of household expenditure in both these countries.
    The major expenditure in Japan is towards goods and services (29%) whereas, in Malaysia, it is housing (34%). On the other hand, the expense towards health care has been the least with 6% in Japan and 3% in Malaysia. In both these countries, the second most spent field is food, accounting for 24% and 27% in Japan and Malaysia respectively.
    Apart from this, 20% of expenditure in Japan is done on transport, while in Malaysia, it is 10%. Also, other goods and services contribute a huge 26% of expenditure in Malaysia whereas, in Japan, a significant amount of 21% is spent on housing.

  62. The pie chart illustrates the average household expenditure in japan and malaysia in the year 2010.

    Overall, it can be seen that the highest percentage of all people spending on housing was more in Japan and Malaysia, while healthcare consistently accounted for the lowest proportion .Futhermore, there are variations in the proportion of expenses done by the people over the period.

    The expenses made for other goods and services were comparatively high in japan for 29% whereas in Malaysia it is for 26%.The costing for food is more in malaysia and is less in japan ,with 29% and 24% respectively.The rates for housing is drastically high in Malaysia with 34% which is 13% more than Japan.

    On the other hand, in both the countries the lowest proportion is seen in healthcare with the percentile of 6% and 3% respectively.Finally,The expenses done for transport is greater in japan which is 20% and is very much less in malaysia for 10%.

  63. The diagrams provided compare the mean expenses of houses of Japan and Malaysia in 2010. The amounts are described in five different categories namely; housing, transport, food, health care and other goods and services. In both countries, nearly a quarter of the total expenditure has been for goods and services that do not include basic needs. Similar amount of money has been spent for both food and housing while the funds allocated for health care remains the smallest. In Japan, the basic needs appears comparatively cheaper since the highest pay has been made for additional goods and services (29 %), even though a similar proportion of money has been utilized for the same in Malaysia too. The most expensive purchase in Malaysia has been housing which has accounted 34% of total outlay, which is a cheaper in Japan (21%). Although fluctuated in small amounts, spending for food is also similar (24% and 27%) in both countries, same as the extra goods and services. A significant difference in disbursement can be observed in transport, in which Japan is much expensive (20%) as twice as the amount of Malaysia (10%). Charges on healthcare has also been twice in Japan (6%) than Malaysia (3%).

  64. The given pie charts illustrate the expenses of families in Japan and Malaysia in the year of 2010. Even though the pattern of both charts look similar, there are some considerable differences.

    According to the chart of Japan, people have spent highest amount of money on goods and services which accounts for more than quarter of the total expenditure. On the other hand, very minute amount like 6% has been spent on health care which is the lowest compared to other expenses.

    However, with regard to Malaysian expenses, majority of money has been given on housing which is 34%. But similar to Japan, Malaysia also shows the lowest expenditure on health care that is 3%

    Compared to Japan, people in Malaysia had to pay considerably lower percentage on transport. In other words, when Japanese have paid one fifth of their expenses on transportation, only half of that percentage has been spent by Malaysians.

    Other than above expenses almost quarter of expenses are on food in both countries.

  65. The pie chart compares the average expenditure of households in Japan and Malaysia in the year 2010.

    Overall, the highest expenditure in Japan was on other goods and services whereas, in Malaysia, housing is the category with the highest portion in the chart. However, the category on which both the countries spent the least was on Health care.

    Malaysia accounted for 26% of expenditure on other goods and services. On the other hand Japan outlay 29% on the same.The amount spent by Malasyia on tansport and and health care is exactly half when compared to expenditure of Japan on the respective categories.

    Average expenditure on food in Japan is recorded to be 24% and is noted to be 27% in Malaysia which is 3% higher. 34% of the total spendings of average households in Malaysia is on housing which is the highest recorded percentage among the expenditures on all the categories, across both the countries and the outlay of Japan on housing is 21%.

  66. The pie charts compare the expenses on different households between Japan and Malaysia in 2010. In general, both Japanese and Malaysians spent on the same households variably. However, both nations paid less on health care.

    According to the first pie chart, housing was at the top priorities of expenses (34%) while food and other services and goods came in the second place with a percentage of 26% and 27% respectively .Lastly, only 10% represents the spending on transportation.

    Turning to the Japanese pie chart, they spent money primarily on other goods and services ;however, the the expenditure on food occupied the second interest for Japanese (24%) while there was a similar rate of expenses had gone for housing and transport reaching to 20% and 21% respectively.

  67. The above chart depicts the proportion of money spend on household expenses in Japan and Malaysia in 2010.

    Overall, Malaysia spending the higher amount on Housing where as Other goods and services is the highest expenditure in Japan. Both the country, spend less amount on health care sector, 3% by Malaysia and 6% by Japan, in the year 2010.

    Japan spends 20% and 6% of the money on transportation and healthcare respectively while Malaysia spends half of the money in both the sectors than Japan. Japan spends 21% expenditure on housing which is 13% lower than what Malaysia spends on those sectors. Both the countries spends somewhat quarter amount of expenditure in the food sector.

    In sectors like other goods and services and health care, Japan spends the most amount of money which is 29% and 6% respectively in 2010 where as, Malaysia spends most on housing and food sector that is 34% and 27% respectively.

  68. There are two pie charts show the portion of family spending in 2010 in Japan and Malaysia. The graphs are divided into 5 usual needs to show how they spend money on these aspects.

    From the left-hand side chart, it shows Japanese families spend the largest ratio of their income on ‘Health care’ while Malaysian (left-hand side chart) families is ‘Housing’.

    The top three types of spendings of two nations are the same, which are housing, health care and food. Health care is in the 2nd place of their spending and food is ranked at 3rd place for the spending of Japanese. Malaysian put more money than Japanese on food so it at the second place of their spending. Health care is the 3rd largest spending of Malaysian. It is common that they spend 4th largest of portion on transport and fewest money on ‘other goods and services’ which is not specified to indicate what type of these expenses are.

  69. The circular chart shows money distribution in Japan and Malaysia in 2010.

    Malaysia is spending the huge some of the household expenditure in housing whereas Japan is spending the most on it’s goods and services.

    Health care and transport are both in proportion of 1/2 with japan exceeding Malaysia. Both the countries spent the least money on the health care.

    Considering the other factors Japan spends it’s 24% on food, 21% on housing, 29% on goods and services. Malaysia on the other side spends 27% on food, 34% on housing, 26% on goods and services.

    Overall the graph shows the highest money expenditure in goods and services, and housing.

  70. The given chart illustrates the middle expenditure in the household in the 2010 year, for two countries: Japan and Malaysia.

    Overall, it is fair to notice that expenditure hasn’t the critical differents.
    The differences were quite small.
    The pie chart is separated on the five sections as Housing, Transport, Food , Health care and Other goods and services.
    That separation gives us understanding what are we analyzing.

    However, I would like to start with other goods and services, here it is possible to see what I wrote about earlier , the differences aren’t that big. In Japan, it’s 29% whereas in Malaysia 3% smaller – 26%.
    The smallest part on the Pie Chart is on Health Care , on this section same similarity, only 3%.
    In Japan on the transport expenditure spent 6% while in Malaysia 3%.
    Food , as everyone knows how we spent on that.That’s probably the reason why the percentage is in the second place after Housing.
    Here we see 24% for Japan , but this time Malaysia is ahead – 27%.
    As I mentioned before, In my opinion the biggest part took Housing , so for that Japan – 21%,Malaysia even bigger percentage – 34%.
    The last one is Transport , here is the biggest difference , just half on Japans expenditure – 20%. Malaysia – only 10%.

    To finalize my analysis,
    Japan and Malaysia didn’t have shocking differences , from the side it seems pretty similar.
    Overall diversity was from 3% to 10%.

  71. The proportions of the average household of Japan and Malaysia are illustrated on the given diagram according to the year 2010.

    The housing and food sectors in Japan are low in percentage compared to Malaysia, while the portions of the health care, transport, other goods and services are significantly higher than that of Malaysia.

    The smallest parts of the householding are accounted for health care in both territories, while the portion of this sector in Japan is doubled as that of Malaysia. Additionally, the proportion of transport in Japan is two times more than in Malaysia, in contrast, the percentages of other goods and services in both countries(29% for Japan, 26% for Malaysia) vary a little.

    The segment that is responsible for food in Japan is just a bit lower than that of Malaysia, 24% and 27% accordingly, while the portion of the housing in Malaysia is considerably higher(13 per cent more) compared to Japan.

  72. The following pie chart depicts the average amount of money spent on household items in the year 2010 by Japanese and Malaysians.

    Overall, the Malaysians seemed to spend more money on food whereas the Japanese were investing into other goods and services. Furthermore, both Japan and Malaysia had the least expenditure in health care.

    According to the chart, Japan was spending most money buying goods and services (29%) although they did spend a substantial amount of money on foods (24%), housing (21%) and in transportation (20%). However, not a lot was spend on health services by the Japanese. In terms of the Malaysians, They spent their money mostly on housing (34%) followed by food (27%) and other goods & services (26%). They did spend just 3% on health care.

    So in comparison, The Malaysians spent more money on housing than the Japanese (34% and 21% respectively). On transportation though, People of Japan spent more (20%) than the people of Malaysia (10%). With Japan spending 27% on food compared to Malaysia’s 24% the Malaysians spent more. While both countries spent the least in health care comparetively the Japanese spent more. Lastly however, The Japanese spent more in the other goods and services catagory.

  73. The two pie charts depicts percentwise distribution of household
    expenses in Japan and Malaysia for the year 2010.

    Overall, the amount spent on the health care is the least for both
    the countries. In Malaysia, the highest expenditure was made on housing
    while in Japan, expenses on other goods and services occupies the
    largest portion in the chart.

    The expenditure made on other goods and services is nearly similar
    for the two countries, with 29% in Japan and 26% in Malaysia. Health care
    facility costs a minimum of 6% and 3% for Japan and Malaysia,
    respectively. Expenses on Food were quite similar for both the countries.

    Malaysia spent the most on Housing as it acquires 34% of the pie
    chart, while housing in Japan cost comparatively as lower
    as 21% only. On the other hand, expenses on Transport in Japan is 20%,
    whereas it contributes only 10% to household expenses in Malaysia.

  74. The pie chart casts the distinctions between Japan and Malaysia based on the magnitude of spending budget for household within a year of 2010. The outgoings are categorized in five main factors which are housing, transport, food, health care and other goods and services symbolized by each colour.
    To judge from the chart, the expenses in Japan is higher in three factors than Malaysia whereas the amount of the rest categories of expenditures in Malaysia is relatively higher than Japan overall.
    In Malaysia, people spent much in housing which is 34% and the most spent classification, when it was 13% less in Japan which means they spent only 21% on it. For transport and health care, it’s clear that people in Japan must have spent 20% and 6% which doubled in size to 10% and 3% in Malaysia. Japan used 24 % on food while the factor is 27% in Malaysia. On other goods and services category, Japan spent 3 % more than Malaysia which just acquired 26%.
    On the whole, Japan spent most in other goods and services but on the other hand there is highest proportion of housing in Malaysia. Eventually in a converse, Malaysia spent least in health care when the two fold proportion of Malaysia is the lowest factor in Japan.

  75. The pie chart depicts the Japanese and Malaysian household expences on average in 2010. They are reported in percentage.

    It can clearly be seen that Japanese people and Malaysians spend the great amount of their income in house maintenance and buying food, whereas they are involved in health care issue at a frightening low grade.

    At a closer glance, housing expenditure peak at 34% in Malaysia, with a interest of around 13% higher than in Japan. Although money spent for primary necessities, like food, is approximately the same in both countries just around 25%, a great rate of earnings is invested in general goods and services, reaching a tiny below 30% in Japan and 3% less in Malaysia.

    Furthermore, Japanese money put in health care and transport is double than the Malaysian one, at 6% and 20% respectively. These two fields are the least promoted by both the countries though.

  76. The pie chart illustrates the typical household expense in Japan and Malaysia for the year 2010.

    Overall, in Malaysia most of the money was spent on housing whereas, in Japan ; transport and food contributed to the most household expenditure. Minimal expenditure was done on healthcare by both the countries.

    According to the data, in Japan and Malaysia least was spend on healthcare ( 3% and 6% respectively). For transport twice was spend in Japan (20%) compared to Malaysia (10%). Significant amount was spend on other goods and services in Japan (29%) while 34% was spent on housing in Malaysia.

    Malaysia spent half of money (3%) on healthcare compared to Japan (6%).
    Furthermore, both the countries spent similar amounts on the food with 27% in Malaysia and 24% in japan .

  77. The pie charts compare the mean amount of money spent in Japanese and Malaysian residences in the year 2010. Overall, most of the spending in Japan that year was on other goods and services, while Malaysians preferred to allocate the majority of their expenses to the housing department.

    29% of Japan’s citizens were most keen on purchasing other goods and services in 2010. Another equally popular category that 24% of them were happy to expend on was food. However, the healthcare sector was the least sought after by the Japanese during that time period, with the lowest ranking of 6%.

    In regard to Malaysians, the field demanding most of their funds in 2010 was housing, displaying a rate of 34%. With a marginal difference of 7%, food was the next area that emptied the Malaysians’ wallets. Much like their Japanese counterparts, the Malaysians didn’t get much involved in paying for their healthcare in 2010, exhibiting a rate of 3%. The transport subdivision of both countries displayed a notable trend that year, wherein Malaysia spent half of the 20% Japan did.

  78. The given pie charts illustrate the average expenditure of Japanese and Malaysian households divided into five different categories for the year 2010.
    Overall, it can be seen that Malaysian households mostly spend on housing, while the expenditure on other goods and services is higher in Japan. However, in both the countries the expenses are the least for health care.
    According to the chart of Japan, its household spends 29% on other goods and services, followed by 24% on food items. Likewise, the expenditure for housing and transportation is closely knitted with 21% and 20% respectively. The least 6% is spent on health care.
    The chart of Malaysia is also somewhat similar to that of Japan. In Malaysia, the household expenditure for housing and accommodation is 34%, which is the highest, and 3% for health care which is the lowest. The second most spent item is on food with 27%, closely trailed by other goods and services at 26%. On the other end, only 10% of the expenditure is on transport.

  79. The pie chart gives the information about the expenses made by household in Japan and Malaysia in the year 2010.

    Overall, it is clear that Japan spend a huge amount of money in other goods and services, whereas housing related expenses were the highest in Malaysia. Interestingly, both countries spent least amount of money in the health sector in 2010.

    To begin with, other goods and services ,which took the highest amount in Japan was accounted for 29%, whereas health care sectors made the least expenditure of 6% in 2010. Moreover Japan spent almost a quarter in food and 21% of total money in housing sector.

    In 2010, the highest amount of money was spent on housing with 34% . Health sector , Which received the least income was comprised for 3%. Furthermore, the expenditure related to food, other goods and services were accounted for just over a quarter in Malaysia.

  80. The pie chart gives the information about the expenses made by household in Japan and Malaysia in the year 2010.

    Overall, it is clear that Japan spend a huge amount of money in other goods and services, whereas housing related expenses were the highest in Malaysia. Interestingly, both countries spent least amount of money in the health sector in 2010.

    To begin with, other goods and services ,which took the highest amount in Japan was accounted for 29%, whereas health care sectors made the least expenditure of 6% in 2010. Moreover Japan spent almost a quarter in food and 21% of total money in housing sector.

    In 2010, the highest amount of money was spent on housing with 34% . Health sector , Which received the least income was comprised for 3%. The second least amount of money was spent on transportation sector which was 10% . Furthermore, the expenditure related to food, other goods and services were accounted for just over a quarter in Malaysia.

  81. The pie chart gives the information about the expenses made by household in Japan and Malaysia in the year 2010.

    Overall, it is clear that Japan spend a huge amount of money in other goods and services, whereas housing related expenses were the highest in Malaysia. Interestingly, both countries spent the least amount of money in the health sector in 2010.

    To begin with, other goods and services ,which took the highest amount in Japan was accounted for 29%, whereas health care sectors made the least expenditure of 6% in 2010. Moreover, Japan spent almost a quarter in food and 21% of total money in housing sector.

    In 2010, the highest amount of money was spent on housing with 34% . Health sector , Which received the least income was comprised for 3%. The second least amount of money was spent on transportation sector which was 10% . Furthermore, the expenditure related to food, other goods and services were accounted for just over a quarter in Malaysia.

  82. The pie chart gives information about the proportion of expenditure on housing, transport, food, health care and other goods and services in Japan and Malaysia in 2010.

    Overall, the percentage of expenditure on housing, goods and services and food is higher in both the nations and the average expenditure on health care was relatively lesser.

    In Japan, a major portion of expenditure was on goods and services and food which is 29 per cent and 24 per cent respectively. On the other hand, health care was the sector which was least invested. Both housing and transport were approximately equal and did not show much variation in expenditure.

    The proportion of housing expenditure in Malaysia was immense which was 34 per cent. In Malaysia, food and goods and services were the two sectors which almost showed equal proportions of expenditures. The expenditure on health care is three times lesser than the expenditure on food in that year.

  83. The pie chart represents the average household expenditure in countries japan and malaysia in the year 2010.

    As can be seen from chart,it is clear that expenditure in housing is high in malaysia with 34% when compared to japan which has a percentage of 21% in its total expenditure.But in case of transport it is altered,that is japan stands at first place with 20% followed by malaysia with 10%.

    Moreover it can be observed that, in terms of food malaysia stands at first with 27%,followed by japan with 24%.Looking at health care it can be viewed that japan and malaysia has a percentage of 6% and 3% of their total expenditure respectively.Same order is seen in expenditures of other goods and services but with 29% in japan and 10% in malaysia.

    Overall,in japan most of their expenditure is spent on transport and healthcare.
    But in malaysia more than half expendtiure goes to housing and food.

  84. The pie chart shows the average of essential household expenditure like housing, transport, food, health care, and other goods and services for Japan and Malaysia in the year 2010.
    As one can see, Malaysian expense highest in housing as compared to Japanese, 34% and 21% respectively. Besides, only 3% of medical expenses and 10% for transportation were used in Malaysia, whereas, food and other goods and services are nearly a quarter of their total expenses, 27% and 26% respectively.
    However, 29% of Japanese expenses are for goods and services, while only 6% of expense is used for medical purpose. Apart from that, 24% expense is used for food consumption, whereas the expenditure for housing is for 21% and 20% for transport.
    Overall, it seems that Japan and Malaysia had minimal expense in health care, whereas their expenditure rose in housing (Japan) and other goods and services( Malaysia).

  85. The pie chart provides the information about the average household expenses of Japan and Malaysia for the year 2010. The expenditure is presented in percentage.
    Overall, the highest expenses of Japan is for food while the highest expenditure in Malaysia is for Health care services.
    Japan spend more income for 3 sectors than Malayasia, for transport, housing and other good and services. However Malaysia spend more for food and transport. The other good and services sector has highest money spend by Japan that is 29% while Malaysia spend only 26%. In housing and transport Japan spend total 6% and 20% which is two folds more than Malaysia.
    However, for food Malayasia spend 27% of their total earning whereas Japan spend on 24%. In Healthcare sector, Malaysia provided 34% of their country money but Japan only spend 21%.

  86. The given two Pie charts show a detailed analysis of the average household consumption expenditure of two countries, Japan and Malaysia during 2010.
    On analysis, we can see that housing is the largest contributor to household consumption in Malaysia(34%) and the third highest in Japan(21%) while on the other hand other goods and services is the largest contributor in Japan(29%) and the third highest in Malaysia(26%). Food is the third highest and nearly equal in both countries with Japan at 24% and Malaysia at 27%. This is followed by transportation which occupies 20% of average consumption expenditure in Japan while 10% in Malaysia. The health care expenditure is lowest in both the countries with Japan at 6% and Malaysia at 3%.
    We can conclude Japan has greater expenditure in other goods and services, health care and transport than in Malaysia while on the other hand, Malaysia has greater expenditure on food and housing than in Malaysia.

  87. The pie chart below compares two different countries, Japan, and Malaysia, and more precisely it reports their average expenditure household. The analysis conducted dates to 2010 and the five sectors listed below are those which mostly contribute to determine the current expenditure value; they are: housing, transport, food, health care and other goods and services.

    Overall, it can be seen that while for Japan the highest cost is that concerning other goods and services followed by the food sector, Malaysia spends more in the housing and immediately after in the food supply. Although these differences are clear, a fact worth noticing is that in both cases, one of the main features determining the rate of household investment is the food supply area.

    First of all, as it is illustrated, most of Japanese expenditure is for other utilities, more precisely 29% of the overall expenses, whereas in Malaysia housing constitutes 34% of the total costs.
    It must be noticed that the two regions have something in common; provided that they respectively invest the 24% and 27% in food, this is in both cases a crucial area in the household expenditure.

  88. The given pie charts provide information about the average spendings on five different categories of Japanese and Malaysian households.
    Overall, it is clear, while expenses on health care represents the smallest shares in both countries, housing and other goods and services account for the major proportions in Malaysia and Japan, respectively.
    Looking at the charts in more detail, it is obvious that a Malaysian citizen spends on average only 3 percentage of the entire expenditures on health care. Whilst that sector is spent on the least too in Japan, the figures are doubled. The pattern is strikingly similar for the category transportation where the proportion being a tenth in Malaysia, is twice as high in Japan.
    A Japanese household’s highest proportion of money goes towards other goods and services, accounting for just under a third, whereas in Malaysia, the figures are slightly lower. Both nations have expenses in relatively similar heights appointed to food with around a quarter. Housing represents the major category in Malaysia reaching figures of 34%, only accounts for around a fifth in Japan.

  89. The pie graph compares Japan and Malaysia in terms of how much money their householders spent on five typical types of expenses in 2010.

    Overall, it is evident from the chart that in both countries most of the household expenditure went to housing, food and other goods and services. Whereas, health care expenses accounted for the smallest proportion among given categories.

    In Malaysia, more than a third of household budget was spent on housing while this category only took up 21%, which was the third largest proportion in Japanese average expenditure. Meanwhile, spending percentages of food and other goods and services in both countries were nearly the same with only 3% difference each. To be more specific, while Japanese householders spent 24% of their budget on food and 29% on other goods and services, in Malaysia the figures were 27% and 26% respectively.

    Regarding two remaining categories, although transport and health care both comprised of lower percentages compared to the other three ones, transport expenses took the upper over health care in both nations. In Japan, 20% of total budget was spent on transport but only 6% of total spending was used to pay for health care services. These figures were in turn double those in Malaysia.

  90. The two pie charts give information about the different expenses that contribute to the total household expenditure spent by the people of Japan and Malaysia in 2010.

    Overall, in Japan, people spend more on Other goods and services and Housing takes the largest share in total spending’s of Malaysian people.
    However, Health care is the least spent expense in both the countries.

    In Japan, Housing and Transport contributes to one-fifth of the total expenses and Food takes 24 percent of the share. Of all the expenses, Health care is the least spent by the people of Japan, with 6 percent.

    In comparison to Japan’s total expenditures, there are slight changes in Malaysia’s average expenditures. Housing dominates the total expenditures with 34 percent. Both Food and Other goods contribute slightly more than a quarter each. One-tenth of the average expenditures go to Transportation. The least spent area is the Health care with 3 percent.

  91. The graphs provided compares how Japnese and Malaysian families spent their money in 2010.

    Overall, housing, food and other goods and services accounted for the majority spending in both countries while they spent the least in health care. Health care and transport were accounted for the least percentage in both countries.

    In 2010, Japanese household spent almost an equal amount of money on food, housing and transport at 24%, 21% and 20% respectively while 29% of household fund was spent on other goods and services. Only 6% was being spent on health care.

    On the other hand, Malaysian family spent just over a third of their budget on accommodation. The next in line are food and other goods and services which were accounted for 27% and 26%. Only 10% of the expenditure were spent on transportation and 3% on the health care which halved the portion of what Japanese family spent.

  92. The two pie charts give information about the different expenses that contribute to the total household expenditure spent by the people of Japan and Malaysia in 2010.

    Overall, in Japan, people spend more on Other goods and services and Housing takes the largest share in total spending’s of Malaysian people.
    However, Health care is the least spent expense in both the countries.

    In Japan, Housing and Transport contributes to one-fifth of the total expenses and Food takes 24 percent of the share. Of all the expenses, Health care is the least spent by the people of Japan, with 6 percent.

    In comparison to Japan’s total expenditures, there are slight changes in Malaysia’s average expenditures. Housing dominates the total expenditures with 34 percent. Both Food and Other goods contribute slightly more than a quarter each. One-tenth of the average expenditures go to Transportation. The least spent area is the Health care with 3 percent.

  93. The Pie chart illustrates the average spent on household in Japan and Malaysia in 2010.

    At first sight we can obviously see that families in both countries spent most of their money on housing, food and other goods as well as services, whereas health care and transport played a peripheral role with lower expenditure.

    Focus on Japan we can deduce from the graph that in 2010 other goods and services accounted for 29% of household expenditure which is the highest of all. The average spent on food is also noticeable with almost a quarter of the total expenditure whilst housing and transport ‘s figures are pretty similar with the proportion of 21% and 20%, respectively. The lowest place is Health care with just 6% of the total expenditure.

    As for Malaysia the highest household spent in 2010 is credited to housing with 34% of total household spent. After that is Food which occupied 27% and Other good and device with just one percent lower. The average household expenditure on transport is scant with only 10% of the total ones and health care is even lower with mere 3%.

  94. The average household expenses including housing, transport, food, health care, and other goods and services, focusing in two countries, Japan and Malaysia are shown by two pie charts below.
    The highest household expense in Japan consists of other goods and services which is 29%. This is roughly the same as Malaysia which spent about 26%. However, the highest household expense in Malaysia is housing, which is 34%. Transport expense made up of 20% in Japan and this is only half of what Malaysians spent on transport. In term of food, Japan and Malaysia spent roughly the same which are 24% and 27%. The lowest expense category in both Japan and Malaysia is health care, which are as low as 6% and 3% respectively.
    Overall, the lowest expenses in both Japan and Malaysia is health care. Malaysians spent the most in housing as compared to Japanese who spent the highest amount in other goods and services.

  95. The two pie charts illustrate the average household spending in two countries, Japan and Malaysia in 2010.
    It is clear that the highest proportion in Malaysia was housing while most money was spended on other goods and services in Japan. In addition, the significant gap in Malaysia was higher than in Japan.
    Looking closer to the pie charts, housing accounted for 34% expenditure in Malaysia while the figure in Japan was lower than 13%. For other goods and services, the percentage in Japan was minimal higher than Malaysia with 29% and 26%, respectively.
    Moreover, looking at some lower figures, accounted for 27% in Malaysia was food and little lower with 24% in Japan. A fifth of money was spended for transport in Japan, while Malaysia’s expenditure was only a tenth, a half of Japan. Lastly, 6% and a half of that was for health care in Japan and Malaysia, correspondingly.

  96. The pie charts illustrate the average money spent by families for household in Japan and Malaysia in 2010.
    Overall, Malaysia spent more money in housing compared to Japan, while Japan spent more money in transport in contrast to Malaysia. Money spent on other sectors was more or less the same in both countries in 2010.
    Families in Malaysia spent its money just over a third, about 34%, in housing, whereas Japan spent about 21% in housing. Again, families in Malaysia spent about 10% of its income for transport, which in contrast was double for families in Japan.
    Furthermore families in Malaysia and Japan spent about 27% and 24% of its income respectively for food. Moreover, about 3% of family’s income was used for health care in Malaysia, which was double in case of Japan. Apart from this, about 26% and 29% of family’s income was used respectively for other goods and services in Malaysia and Japan.

  97. The given pie chart shows the annual expenditure spent on some categories such as housing, food, transport, health care and other goods and services in japan and Malaysia in the eyar 2010.
    It is evident from the pie chart that most of the expenditure in japan is spent on transport which is about 29% whereas it is not the highest in malaysia.The lowest percentage expenditure spent is on health care which is about 6%.However, it is similar in the malaysia which is 3% .
    The highest percentage of money spent in malaysia is on housing. The percentage of money spent on food and other goods and services seems to have nearly same percentage when compared to the other categories.
    Overall, The perecntage expenditure spent on food,other goods, and housing has an almost similar percentages between malaysia and japan in 2010. However, The
    percentage of money spent on housing in japan is higher than that of Malaysia. By contrast, Both the countries spent the least amount to the health care sector which is one of the common feature betwwen the countries.

  98. The 2 given pie charts illustrates the average expenditure amongst Japanese and Malaysian households in the year 2010.
    In general, the household from the 2 countries utilized their financial resources quite the same. During the year 2010, both Malaysian and Japanese households spent most of their financial resources on these top 3 sectors: Housing, Food, and other goods and services. Both countries also spent the least on healthcare, with only 3% total expenditure and 6% total expenditure for Japanese and Malaysian households respectively.
    While both countries spent the most on the same three sectors, the rankings of these three sectors are different for Malaysia and Japan. The data showed us that in Japan, the sector that ranked with the highest proportion for expenditure was other goods and services at 29%. However, this sector only ranked third in Malaysian households with proportions at 26%. Malaysia, on the other hand spent the most on Housing, with 34%. The food sector had the second highest proportion for both countries, with 27% for Malaysia and 24% for Japan.
    Transportation is where the 2 countries spent differently on. Japanese households spent an average of 20% of their financial resources on transportation, nearly half as much of that in Malaysian households who only spent 10%.

  99. The mean domestic expenditure in two different nations in the first decade of 21st century is illustrated by given pie charts.

    It is vived from overall perspective that the least amount of money was spent on heath by both countries as compare to other factors.

    At the fleeting glance on the data of Japan; 21% of capital was spent on housing that was 1% more than of transport expenses. Also; there was a difference of 5% between food and other goods and services as 24% and 29% was spent on these respectively. However; only 6% was noted for health.

    Probing further; on housing 34% was expended in Malaysia; whereas merely 3% was on health. Moreover; the spending on food and other commodities was near about a quater as it covered 26% and 27% of money orderly. The transportation expenses were counted only 10% in 2010.

  100. The pie chart depicts the standard spending of families in Japan and Malaysia for year 2010

    All in all, The pie chart paints a picture of categories of expense items like housing, transport, food, and many more between two countries.

    Firstly, The Majority of money is eaten up by Housing 34% in Malaysia whereas the housing in Japan is near to a fifth. It displays that housing is higher in Malaysia than in Japan. However The Highest percentage in Japan household expenses is Food which is 24% in comparison to Malaysia still is it can be considered less. Malaysia food expense totals to 27%.

    Furthermore, The transport in Japan is higher than in Malaysia. The transport is expensive due to which it sums to 20% in Japan and only one of ten in Malaysia. Fuel can be cheaper in Malaysia, as a consequence to which the transport is less than Japan.

    In addition to it, There are various things in each country which differ from the other. In account to it they are compared as Other goods and services. Japan is in the lead for it with 29% compared to Malaysia’s 26%. A slight difference is observed but the components for this other goods and service can be of a major difference. It is the highest expenditure in Japan’s pie chart whereas for Malaysia housing is still in Lead. Not the least but the priority of all, Health. Health is wealth and also can be quantified in expenditure for households as 6% for Japan and half of Japan in Malaysia which is 3%.

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